Most Common Ways To Give Dogs Water To Drink

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There’s several different ways to leave water for your dog so they don’t go thirsty.

In this guide, we list some of the most common ways.

 

(NOTE: this is a general information guide only, and is not professional advice, or a substitute for professional advice. A qualified vet or animal expert is the only person qualified to give you expert advice in regards to your pet/s)

 

Most Common Ways To Give A Dog Water To Drink

 

1. Water Bowl

Probably the most common way – fill the bowl, and re-fill it regularly when it’s getting low on supply.

You’ll also need to clean it regularly of any mold or slime.

A stainless steel water bowl can be an alternative to a plastic one.

A popular SS water bowl is the:

The good thing about water bowls and buckets is that they don’t have filter and pumps that need to be replaced, they don’t need an electrical supply, and they are easier to spot mold and slime on.

 

2. Water Bucket/Pail

The same things apply as for a water bowl.

A water bucket though generally allows you a bigger water capacity than a water bowl, so it can be good for bigger dogs or multiple dogs.

A popular SS water pail is the:

 

3. Gravity Water Dispensers

They work by automatically refilling the water bowl or reservoir with a gravity operated water jug.

One downside to a gravity water dispenser can be taking it apart to clean slime/mold – this is particularly applicable when the reservoir is a clip together plastic reservoir. If it’s an open one piece bowl/reservoir, you may not have that problem.

A popular gravity dispenser is the:

 

4. Water Fountains

A water fountain is a device that regulates a stream of filtered water into a water reservoir.

They usually operate with water filter pads, a pump, and need to be connected to an electrical outlet.

Some may not be suitable for outdoor use.

They usually require replacement of water filter pads, and also the pump at some point.

A popular water fountain is the:

 

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