How To Pick Up Dog Poop Diarrhea and Runny/Wet Dog Poop Inside On Carpets, Outside In The Yard, And On Walks

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Whether you’ve got a puppy or a dog with some type of stomach virus, you’ll want to know how to pick up dog poop diarrhea and clean it up.

There’s three main situations where owners will need to pick up the diarrhea – outside in the front or back yard, inside on the carpet or another surface, and on walks (can be the trickiest and slightly embarrassing).

Of course, the best solution is to prevent the diarrhea in the first place. Diarrhea should only be a temporary problem because a healthy dog should deposit solid stools.

Have a read of this informational guide about some of the causes of diarrhea in puppies and dogs – if you suspect your dog’s issue is health related, see a vet to get a professional opinion and get the problem fixed.

In the mean time, let’s check out the pick up and clean up options.

 

How To Pick Up Dog Poop Diarrhea & Runny/Wet Dog Poop  Inside On Carpets, Outside In The Yard, And On Walks

 

How To Pick Up Dog Poop Diarrhea In The Yard And Outside – On Grass, Pavement, Rocks & In The Garden

Most times diarrhea outside will either be on the grass, on rocks, in the garden or on pavers/cement.

Diarrhea On Grass

You have four options with diarrhea on grass:

  • Wait until the diarrhea dries and pick it up with a scoop or shovel
  • Coagulate/thicken the diarrhea by sprinkling it with dirt, sand or kitty litter – the diarrhea should become more clumpy and should be easier to pick up
  • Spray the diarrhea with freeze spray and pick it up (although this has inconsistent and varied results)
  • Spray the diarrhea with a hose to separate an move it – spray it off into your nearby garden bed. Wait for the remaining diarrhea to dry and scoop it with a scooper or shovel

Mowing or cutting the grass every 1 to 2 weeks once you’ve attempted to clean up the diarrhea with any of the above methods should leave the grass looking fresh and clean.

Diarrhea on Rocks

Diarrhea on rocks can be all sorts of tricky to clean up.

If there is dirt underneath the rocks, the best and easiest approach is simply to spray down the rocks with your hose on high pressure, and let the diarrhea sink into the dirt.

If your rocks are sitting on a layer of plastic, remove the unclean rocks, and hose them off on the grass or in the garden until clean.

Diarrhea In The Garden

The best thing to do is probably to let the diarrhea dry and pick it up with a scoop.

Diarrhea On Pavers/Cement

With gloves on, clean up as much of the diarrhea as you can with paper towels, and remove any solids. Dispose of immediately.

Wash over the area where the diarrhea was with water and some type of safe/non-toxic disinfectant, or diluted bleach, and then with pure water again. 

 

How To Pick Up Dog Poop Diarrhea On Walks

We’ve definitely been caught out with doggy diarrhea on walks before. It can be awkward and embarrassing to say the least!

If your dog poops on grass while out, simply pick up the diarrhea by scooping up the surrounding grass and dirt with the diarrhea. It will leave a small divet – but I’m sure other people will appreciate that a lot more than stepping in it!

For dog diarrhea on pavements and walk ways, the best solution we have found to this is to simply take a section or two of standard super absorbent paper towel with you on your walks (fold it up and put it in your pocket), along with your dog poop bags.

When your dog deposits, place the folded section of paper towel over the poop and it should absorb a good deal of it – then pick up the paper towel and as much of the poop as you can. It’s not going to be perfect, but it will be ALOT better than leaving a big smear on the pavement.

If you are aware your dog has diarrhea, it’s best to avoid public walkways with heavy traffic altogether.

 

How To Clean Diarrhea and Runny/Wet Dog Poop From The Carpet

Diarrhea on the carpet can be very messy, but you can definitely clean it up effectively.

You can consider the following general cleaning steps:

NOTE: some people suggest letting diarrhea dry on your carpet overnight before cleaning it, but if you can’t bear the sight or smell…

1. Put on some latex gloves

2. If you are gagging from the smell, consider lighting stuffing you nose with some paper towel, or placing a peg over your nose from the smell

3. Have a disposal bag open next to you

4. Take a super absorbent paper towel, and blot/dab the towel over the top of the diarrhea. Don’t push down as you’ll push the poop further into the carpet. You should be able to remove a good deal of the surface runny diarrhea this way. Place the soiled paper towel in the bag

5. Any solids left after dabbing the runny poop can be picked up with paper towel and also placed in the bag

6. You should now essentially be left with a stain. You want to break up, disinfect, remove and deodorise this stain. You’ll need a good stain remover – you can read this guide for stain removal tips and a list of some good pet stain removers and disinfectants

7. Follow the directions on the pet stain remover bottle – and disinfect, break up and remove the stain with the stain remover and an old cloth. Have an old bowl or bucket with warm water that you can use with the cloth and stain remover

8. Once the stain is removed – dispose safely of all the soiled paper in the bag and clean the cloth and bucket thoroughly

9. Aerate the room, and consider drying out the wet carpet patch with baking soda, bi-carb soda or another carpet powder

10. De-odorise the carpet with a de-odorising carpet powder, or try other de-odorising options like Pet Deodorising candles – check out this guide for more information on both

 

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